nodebb problem loading emojis on composer

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  • 0 Votes
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    @patrick-anderson It should be on the network tab of your browsers console. Try uploading something while the network tab is open and it should show you the failing request. Then you can check what the server has returned in the same window.

  • 0 Votes
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    You should always have a backup before updating anything in my opinion. Better to be safe. I dont see any problems to update from 0.7.1 to 1.7.5.

    Download new source Copy over the config and static content (if you have any) run ./nodebb upgrade

    Simple as pie, but remember. Always backup first 😛

  • 0 Votes
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    Thanks! Pulling right now 🙂

    [EDIT] Seems to have solved it!

  • Using NodeBB with AngularJS

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    Some others have asked about it as well. I tried to do it but was unsuccessful. I think the problem is RequireJS, it might work with the proper configuration of requirejs and angular, but I haven't been able to figure it out.

  • 0 Votes
    24 Posts
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    I started off this quest with just a simple problem. To have the ability for users to address my nodebb forum (http://theamericanbulletin.com:8080) as (“http://forum.theamericanbulletin.com”). This simple problem turned into a quest through countless videos and reading ( at least fifty) mindnumbing posts on blogs and other forums. I am running a Windows server ( 2008 ) with IIS to service my Wordpress main site. My NodeBB forum is listening on port 8080. All advice was to work within the framework of Windows and IIS, using 'Rewrite', to route traffic on the Server. After days of frustration, I had to come up with a better plan. One that gets me above proprietary nuances. The only way to do that was to get hold of port 80 myself..my own proxy server.. and what better webserver than Nodejs. With little of a search I came accoss this project.

    GitHub - http-party/node-http-proxy: A full-featured http proxy for node.js

    A full-featured http proxy for node.js. Contribute to http-party/node-http-proxy development by creating an account on GitHub.

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    GitHub (github.com)

    I git cloned the above link. Renamed the new directory to nodeproxy e:\nodeproxy> npm install ( pulls all the needed modules) created a new directory under the new 'nodeproxy' entitled MyProxy Created the MyProxy.js file ( contents below ) Moved my WordPress to listen on port 8081 in IIS Started new proxy server (e:\nodeproxy\myproxy> node myproxy.js ) Done!

    Some notes about the js file. When I first started I used this post as a guideline. It used a routing table... exactly what I was looking for. Although I was not needing to spin-up three test servers, this provided some insight into the power if this little application. I could, if I wanted to.... spin-up as many listeners as I wanted..... listening on whatever, or as many port(s) as I wanted.

    nodejs: routing table using http-proxy

    Trying to put in place an http proxy with a custom routing logic using http-proxy 1.4.3, following this tuto and executing the code below: var httpProxy = require("http-proxy"); var url = require(...

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    Stack Overflow (stackoverflow.com)

    var httpProxy = require("http-proxy"); var url = require("url"); httpProxy.createServer(function(req, res, proxy) { var hostname = req.headers.host.split(":")[0]; var pathname = url.parse(req.url).pathname; // Options for the outgoing proxy request. var options = { host: hostname }; // Routing logic if(hostname == "127.0.0.1") { options.port = 8083; } else if(pathname == "/upload") { options.port = 8082; options.path = "/"; } else { options.port = 8081; } // (add more conditional blocks here) proxy.proxyRequest(req, res, options); }).listen(8080); console.log("Proxy listening on port 8080"); // We simulate the 3 target applications var http = require("http"); http.createServer(function(req, res) { res.end("Request received on 8081"); }).listen(8081); http.createServer(function(req, res) { res.end("Request received on 8082"); }).listen(8082); http.createServer(function(req, res) { res.end("Request received on 8083"); }).listen(8083);

    I modified the above code to tailor it to my routes, but the server kept breaking. The proxy would throw a “socket hang up” when I moved between the Wordpress site and the NodeBB site. The error was not getting caught and the proxy would just break and go back to a system prompt. Another day of research lead me to this post.

    Not Found

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    (www.clock.co.uk)

    It was in this post where the idea of wrapping the proxy-server within a domain arose. Perfect! I can pass the error up to the domain and let it dispose of it while the proxy keeps serving ( at least that's how I think it works). Plus the added benefit of having and overlord (parent) to all the potential listeners that could be spun-up to report to. But that is a whole different subject.

    So I added a Domain to the mix and came-up with a working solution. While this only apples to those with 'full' control over their servers, it does add a layer of control over proprietary systems running on your machine, and frees the developer (to a point) from those systems. I do not have to mess with rewrite... or some Apache routine tables. This is 'clean' and simple.

    Please feel free to improve on this concept and tighten this up. There is room for lots of improvement here. Please add to the knowledge.

    Rich

    MyProxy.Js

    var util = require('util'),
    http = require('http'),
    url = require('url'),
    domain = require('domain')
    httpProxy = require('../lib/http-proxy'),
    proxy = httpProxy.createProxyServer({});
    serverDomain = domain.create();
    proxy.on('error', function(err, req, res)
    {
    console.log(err.message);
    });
    serverDomain.run(function () {http.createServer(function(req, res)
    {
    var reqd = domain.create()
    reqd.add(req)
    reqd.add(res)
    // On error dispose of the domain
    reqd.on('error', function (error) {
    console.error('Error', error, req.url)
    reqd.dispose()
    });
    var oUrl = url.parse(req.url);
    if (typeof req.headers !== 'undefined' && req.headers.host.split)
    {
    var hostname = req.headers.host.split(":")[0];
    var pathname = oUrl.pathname;
    switch(hostname)
    {
    case 'forum.theamericanbulletin.com':
    proxy.web(req, res, { target: 'http://localhost:8080' });
    break;
    default:
    proxy.web(req, res, { target: 'http://localhost:8081' });
    };
    console.log(hostname);
    console.log(pathname);
    }
    }).listen(80,function(){
    console.log('proxy listening on port 80');
    });
    });